Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

v3.20.4
Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation
Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation
The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and include the accounts of Codexis, Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.
Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to 2020 presentation. In June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued guidance requiring implementation of a new impairment model applicable to financial assets measured at amortized cost which, among other things required that accounts receivable, contract assets, unbilled receivables and related allowances be reclassified as financial assets. The results of the year ended December 31, 2020 reflect the adoption of the accounting standards including Accounting Standard Update (“ASU”) 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments which added a new impairment model applicable to our financial assets measured at amortized cost. See “Recently adopted accounting pronouncements” for details regarding the adoption of these standards. The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Codexis, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.
Financial Statement Exclusion
The total net loss in the consolidated statements of operations for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 is not different from our consolidated comprehensive loss. The consolidated financial statements exclude the consolidated statements of comprehensive loss for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Use of Estimates
Use of Estimates
The preparation of our consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires us to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that may affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, equity, revenues and expenses and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We regularly assess these estimates which primarily affect revenue recognition, inventories, goodwill arising out of business acquisitions, accrued liabilities, stock awards, and the valuation allowances associated with deferred tax assets. Actual results could differ from those estimates and such differences may be material to the consolidated financial statements. The full extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic will directly or indirectly impact our business, results of operations and financial condition, including sales, expenses, reserves and allowances, manufacturing, research and development costs and employee-related amounts, will depend on future developments that are highly uncertain, and may not be accurately predicted, including as a result of new information that may emerge concerning COVID-19 and the actions taken to contain or treat COVID-19, as well as the economic impact on local, regional, national and international customers, markets and economies.
Segment Reporting
Segment Reporting
We report two business segments, Performance Enzymes and Novel Biotherapeutics, which are based on our operating segments. Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise about which separate financial information is available that is evaluated regularly by the chief operating decision maker or decision making group (“CODM”), in deciding how to allocate resources, and in assessing performance. Our CODM is our Chief Executive Officer. Our business segments are primarily based on our organizational structure and our operating results as used by our CODM in assessing performance and allocating resources for the Company. We do not allocate or evaluate assets by segment.
The Novel Biotherapeutics segment focuses on new opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry to discover or improve novel biotherapeutic drug candidates that will target human diseases that are in need of improved therapeutic interventions. Similarly, we believe that we can deploy our platform technology to improve specific characteristics of a customer’s pre-existing biotherapeutic drug candidate, such as its activity, stability, or immunogenicity. The Performance Enzymes segment consists of biocatalyst products and services with focus on pharmaceutical, food, molecular diagnostics, and other industrial markets.
Foreign Currency Translation
Foreign Currency Translation
The USD is the functional currency for our operations outside the United States. Accordingly, nonmonetary assets and liabilities originally acquired or assumed in other currencies are recorded in USD at the exchange rates in effect at the date they were acquired or assumed. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in other currencies are translated into United States dollars at the exchange rates in effect at the balance sheet date. Translation adjustments are recorded in other expense in the consolidated statements of operations. Gains and losses realized from non-USD transactions, including intercompany balances not considered as permanent investments, denominated in currencies other than an entity’s functional currency are included in other expense in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.
Revenue Recognition
Revenue Recognition
Our revenues are derived primarily from product revenue and collaborative research and development agreements. The majority of our contracts with customers typically contain multiple products and services. We account for individual products and services separately if they are distinct-that is, if a product or service is separately identifiable from other items in the contract and if a customer can benefit from it on its own or with other resources that are readily available to the customer.
In determining the appropriate amount of revenue to be recognized as we fulfill our obligations under our product revenue and collaborative research and development agreements, we perform the following steps: (i) identification of the promised goods or services in the contract; (ii) determination of whether the promised goods or services are performance obligations, including whether they are distinct in the context of the contract; (iii) measurement of the transaction price, including the constraint on variable consideration; (iv) allocation of the transaction price to the performance obligations based on estimated selling prices; and (v) recognition of revenue when (or as) we satisfy each performance obligation.
The majority of our collaborative contracts contain multiple revenue streams such as upfront and/or annual license fees, fees for research and development services, contingent milestone payments upon achievement of contractual criteria, and royalty fees based on the licensees' product revenue or usage, among others. We determine the stand-alone selling price (“SSP”) and allocate consideration to distinct performance obligations. Typically, we base our SSPs on our historical sales. If an SSP is not directly observable, then we estimate the SSP taking into consideration market conditions, forecasted sales, entity-specific factors and available information about the customer. We estimate the SSP for license rights by using historical information if licenses have been previously sold to customers and for new licenses, we consider multiple methods, including a discounted cash flow method which includes the following key assumptions: the development timelines, revenue forecasts, commercialization expenses, discount rate, and the probability of technical and regulatory success.
We account for a contract with a customer when there is approval and commitment from both parties, the rights of the parties are identified, payment terms are identified, the contract has commercial substance and collectability of consideration is probable. Non-cancellable purchase orders received from customers to deliver a specific quantity of product, when combined with our order confirmation, in exchange for future consideration, create enforceable rights and obligations on both parties and constitute a contract with a customer.
We measure revenue based on the consideration specified in the contract with each customer, net of any sales incentives and taxes collected on behalf of government authorities. We recognize revenue in a manner that best depicts the transfer of promised goods or services to the customer, when control of the product or service is transferred to a customer. We make significant judgments when determining the appropriate timing of revenue recognition.
The following is a description of principal activities from which we generate revenue:
Product Revenue
Product revenue consist of sales of biocatalysts, pharmaceutical intermediates and Codex® biocatalyst panels and kits. A majority of our product revenue is made pursuant to purchase orders or supply agreements and is recognized at a point in time when the control of the product has been transferred to the customer typically upon shipment. For some of the products that we develop, we recognize revenue over time as the product is manufactured because we have a right to payment from the customer under a binding, non-cancellable purchase order, and there is no alternate use of the product for us as it is specifically made for the customer’s use.
Certain of our agreements provide options to customers which they can exercise at a future date, such as the option to purchase our product during the contract duration at discounted prices and an option to extend their contract, among others. In accounting for customer options, we determine whether an option is a material right and this requires us to exercise significant judgment. If a contract provides the customer an option to acquire additional goods or services at a discount that exceeds the range of discounts that we typically give for that product or service for the same class of customer, or if the option provides the customer certain additional goods or services for free, the option may be considered a material right. If the contract gives the customer the option to acquire additional goods or services at their normal SSPs, we would likely determine that the option is not a material right and, therefore, account for it as a separate performance obligation when the customer exercises the option. We primarily account for options which provide material rights using the alternative approach available pursuant to the applicable accounting guidance, as we concluded we meet the criteria for using the alternative approach. Therefore, the transaction price is calculated as the expected consideration to be received for all the goods and services we expect to provide under the contract. We update the transaction price for expected consideration, subject to constraint, each reporting period if our estimate of future goods to be ordered by customers change.
Research and Development Revenues
We perform research and development activities as specified in each respective customer agreement. We identify each performance obligation in our research and development agreements at contract inception. We allocate the consideration to each distinct performance obligation based on the estimated SSP of each performance obligation. Performance obligations included in our research and services agreements typically include research and development services for a specified term, periodic reports and small samples of enzyme produced.
The majority of our research and development agreements are based on a contractual rate per dedicated project team working on the project. The underlying product that we develop for customers does not create an asset with an alternative use to us and the customer receives benefits as we perform the work towards completion. Thus, our performance obligations are generally satisfied over time as the service is performed. We utilize an appropriate method of measuring progress towards the completion of our performance obligations to determine the timing of revenue recognition. For each performance obligation that is satisfied over time, we recognize revenue using a single measure of progress, typically based on hours incurred.
Our contracts frequently provide customers with rights to use or access our products or technology, along with other promises or performance obligations. We must first determine whether the license is distinct from other promises, such as our promise to manufacture a product. If we determine that the customer cannot benefit from the license without our manufacturing capability, the license will be accounted for as combined with the other performance obligations. If we determine that a license is distinct and has significant standalone functionality, we would recognize revenues from a functional license at a point in time when the license is transferred to the customer, and the customer can use and benefit from it. We estimate the SSP for license rights by using historical information if licenses have been previously sold to customers and for new licenses, we consider multiple methods, including a discounted cash flow method which includes the following key assumptions: the development timelines, revenue forecasts, commercialization expenses, discount rate, and the probability of technical and regulatory success. For licenses that have been previously sold to other customers, we use historical information to determine SSP.
At the inception of each arrangement that includes variable consideration such as development milestone payments, we evaluate whether the milestones are considered probable of being reached and estimate the amount to be included in the transaction price using the most likely amount method. If it is probable that a significant revenue reversal would not occur, the associated milestone value is included in the transaction price. Milestone payments that are not within our control or the licensee, such as regulatory approvals, are not considered probable of being achieved until those approvals are received. The transaction price is then allocated to each performance obligation on a relative stand-alone selling price basis, for which we recognize revenue as or when the performance obligations under the contract are satisfied. At the end of each subsequent reporting period, we re-evaluate the probability of achievement of such development milestones and any related constraint, and if necessary, adjust our estimate of the overall transaction price. Any such adjustments are recorded on a cumulative catch-up basis, which would affect license, collaboration and other revenues and earnings in the period of adjustment.
Our CodeEvolver® platform technology transfer collaboration agreements typically include license fees, upfront fees, and variable consideration in the form of milestone payments, and sales or usage-based royalties. We have recognized revenues from our platform technology transfer agreements over time as our customer learns to use our technology.
We also have an agreement under which we have granted a functional license to some elements of our biocatalyst technology. We recognize revenues for the functional license at a point in time when the control of the license and technology transfers to the customer.
For license agreements that include sales or usage-based royalty payments to us, we do not recognize revenue until the underlying sales of the product or usage has occurred. At the end of each reporting period, we estimate the royalty amount. We recognize revenue at the later of (i) when the related sale of the product occurs, or (ii) when the performance obligation to which some or all of the royalty has been allocated has been satisfied, or partially satisfied.
Practical Expedients, Elections, and Exemptions
We apply certain practical expedients available which permit us not to adjust the amount of consideration for the effects of a significant financing component if, at contract inception, the expected period between the transfer of promised goods or services and customer payment is one year or less.
We perform monthly services under our research and development agreements and we use a practical expedient permitting us to recognize revenue at the same time that we have the right to invoice our customer for monthly services completed to date.
We have elected to treat shipping and handling activities as fulfillment costs.
We have elected to record revenue net of sales and other similar taxes.
Contract Assets
Contract assets include amounts related to our contractual right to consideration for completed performance obligations not yet invoiced. Contract assets are reclassified to receivables when the rights become unconditional.
Contract Liabilities
Contract liabilities are recorded as deferred revenues and include payments received in advance of performance under the contract. Contract liabilities are realized when the development services are provided to the customer or control of the products has been transferred to the customer. A portion of our contract liabilities relate to supply arrangements that contain material rights that are recognized using the alternative method, under which the aggregate amount invoiced to the customer for shipped products, including contractual fees, is higher than the amount of revenue recognized based on the transaction price allocated to the shipped products.
Contract Costs
We recognize a non-current asset for the incremental costs of obtaining a contract with a customer if the entity expects to recover such costs. Incremental costs are costs that would not have been incurred if the contract had not been obtained. Examples of contract costs are commissions paid to sales personnel. We do not typically incur significant incremental costs because the compensation of our salespeople are not based on contracts closed but on a mixture of company goals, individual goals, and sales goals. If a commission paid is directly related to obtaining a specific contract, our policy is to capitalize and amortize such costs on a systematic basis, consistent with the pattern of transfer of the good or service to which the asset relates. Contract costs are reported in other non-current assets.
Cost of Product Revenue
Cost of product revenue comprises both internal and third party fixed and variable costs including materials and supplies, labor, facilities, and other overhead costs associated with our product sales. Shipping costs are included in our cost of product revenue. Such charges were not significant in any of the periods presented.
Fulfillment costs, such as shipping and handling, are recognized at a point in time and are included in cost of product sales.
Cost of Research and Development Services
Cost of research and development services related to services under research and development agreements approximate the research funding over the term of the respective agreements and is included in research and development expense. Costs of services provided under license and platform technology transfer agreements are included in research and development expenses and are expensed in the periods in which such costs are incurred.
Research and Development Expenses
Research and Development Expenses
Research and development expenses consist of costs incurred for internal projects and partner-funded collaborative research and development activities, as well as license and platform technology transfer agreements, as mentioned above. These costs include our direct and research-related overhead expenses, which include salaries and other personnel-related expenses (including stock-based compensation), occupancy-related costs, supplies, and depreciation of facilities and laboratory equipment, as well as external costs, and are expensed as incurred. Costs to acquire technologies that are utilized in research and development and that have no alternative future use are expensed when incurred.
Advertising AdvertisingAdvertising costs are expensed as incurred and included in selling, general and administrative expenses in the consolidated statements of operations.
Stock-Based Compensation
Stock-Based Compensation
We use the Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model to estimate the fair value of options granted under our equity incentive plans. The Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model requires the use of assumptions, including the expected term of the award and the expected stock price volatility. The expected term is based on historical exercise behavior on similar awards, giving consideration to the contractual terms, vesting schedules and expectations of future employee behavior. We use historical volatility to estimate expected stock price volatility. The risk-free rate assumption is based on United States Treasury instruments whose terms are consistent with the expected term of the stock options. The expected dividend assumption is based on our history and expectation of dividend payouts.
Restricted Stock Units (“RSUs"), Restricted Stock Awards (“RSAs”) and performance-contingent restricted stock units (“PSUs”) are measured based on the fair market values of the underlying stock on the dates of grant. Performance based options (“PBOs”) are measured using Black-Scholes-Merton option pricing model. The vesting of PBOs and PSUs awarded is conditioned upon the attainment of one or more performance objectives over a specified period and upon continued employment through the applicable vesting date. At the end of the performance period, shares of stock subject to the PBOs and PSUs vest based upon both the level of achievement of performance objectives within the performance period and continued employment through the applicable vesting date.
Stock-based compensation expense is calculated based on awards ultimately expected to vest and is reduced for estimated forfeitures at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates. The estimated annual forfeiture rates for stock options, RSUs, PSUs, PBOs, and RSAs are based on historical forfeiture experience.
The estimated fair value of stock options, RSUs and RSAs are expensed on a straight-line basis over the vesting term of the grant and the estimated fair value of PSUs and PBOs are expensed using an accelerated method over the term of the award once management has determined that it is probable that the performance objective will be achieved. Compensation expense is recorded over the requisite service period based on management's best estimate as to whether it is probable that the shares awarded are expected to vest. Management assesses the probability of the performance milestones being met on a continuous basis.
Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash and Cash EquivalentsWe consider all highly liquid investments with maturity dates of three months or less at the date of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on deposit with banks and money market funds. The majority of cash and cash equivalents is maintained with major financial institutions in the United States. Deposits with these financial institutions may exceed the amount of insurance provided on such deposits.
Restricted Cash Restricted CashIn 2016, we began the process of liquidating our Indian subsidiary. The local legal requirements for liquidation required us to maintain our subsidiary's cash balance in an account managed by a legal trustee to satisfy our financial obligations.Pursuant to the terms of a lease agreement for our Redwood City, CA facilities, we obtained a letter of credit collateralized by cash deposit balance
Fair Value Measurements
Fair Value Measurements
Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. In determining fair value, we utilize valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs to the extent possible and we consider counterparty credit risk in our assessment of fair value. Carrying amounts of financial instruments, including cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable, and accrued liabilities, approximate their fair values as of the balance sheet dates because of their short maturities.
The fair value hierarchy distinguishes between (1) market participant assumptions developed based on market data obtained from independent sources (observable inputs) and (2) an entity’s own assumptions about market participant assumptions developed based on the best information available in the circumstances (unobservable inputs). The fair value hierarchy consists of three broad levels, giving the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are described below:
Level 1: Inputs that are unadjusted, quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities at the measurement date.
Level 2: Inputs that are either directly or indirectly observable for the asset or liability through correlation with market data at the measurement date and for the duration of the instrument’s anticipated life.
Level 3: Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities and which reflect management’s best estimate of what market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability at the measurement date.
Concentrations of Credit Risk
Concentrations of Credit Risk
Financial instruments that potentially subject us to significant concentrations of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, contract assets, non-marketable securities, and restricted cash. Cash that is not required for immediate operating needs is invested principally in money market funds. Cash and cash equivalents are invested through banks and other financial institutions in the United States, India, and the Netherlands. Such deposits in those countries may be in excess of insured limits.
Financial Assets and Allowances
Financial Assets and Allowances
We currently sell enzymes primarily to pharmaceutical and fine chemicals companies throughout the world by the extension of trade credit terms based on an assessment of each customer's financial condition. Trade credit terms are generally offered without collateral and may include an insignificant discount for prompt payment for specific customers. To manage our credit exposure, we perform ongoing evaluations of our customers' financial conditions. In addition, accounts receivable include amounts owed to us under our collaborative research and development agreements. We recognize accounts receivable at invoiced amounts and we maintain a valuation allowance as follows:
Allowance for credit losses from January 1, 2020
On and subsequent to January 1, 2020, our financial results reflect an impairment model (known as the “current expected credit loss model” or “CECL”) based on estimates and forecasts of future conditions requiring recognition of a lifetime of expected credit losses at inception on our financing receivables measured at amortized costs which is comprised of accounts receivable, contract assets, and unbilled receivables. We have determined that our financing receivables share similar risk characteristics including: (i) customer origination in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industry, (ii) similar historical credit loss pattern of customers (iii) no meaningful trade receivable differences in terms, (iv) similar historical credit loss experience and (v) our belief that the composition of certain assets are comparable to our historical portfolio used to develop loss history. As a result, we measured the allowance for credit loss (“ACL”) on a collective basis. Our ACL methodology considers how long the asset has been past due, the financial condition of the customers, which includes ongoing quarterly evaluations and assessments of changes in customer credit ratings, and other market data that we believe are relevant to the collectability of the assets. Nearly all financing receivables are due from customers that are highly rated by major rating agencies and have a long history of no credit loss. We derive our ACL by establishing an impairment rate attributable to assets not yet identified as impaired.
We derive our ACL by initially relying on our historical financing receivable loss rate which contemplates the full contractual life of the assets sharing similar risk characteristics, adjusted to reflect (i) the extent to which we have determined current conditions differ from the conditions that existed for the period over which historical loss information was evaluated and (ii) by taking into consideration the changes in certain macroeconomic historical and forecasted information. We apply the ACL to past due financing receivables and record charges to the ACL as a provision to credit loss expense in the Statement of Operations. Financing receivables we identify as uncollectible are also charged against the ACL. We adjust the impairment rate to reflect the extent to which we have determined current conditions differ from the conditions that existed for the period over which historical loss information was evaluated. Adjustments to historical loss information may be qualitative or quantitative in nature and reflect changes related to relevant data.
In the year ended December 31, 2020, inputs to our CECL forecast incorporated forward-looking adjustments associated with the COVID-19 pandemic which we believe are appropriate to incorporate due to the uncertainty of the economic impact on cash flows from our financial assets.
Allowance for credit losses before January 1, 2020Prior to January 1, 2020, the allowances for doubtful accounts reflected our best estimates of probable losses inherent in our accounts receivable and contract assets balances. The allowance determination was based on known troubled accounts, historical experience, and other currently available evidence. Uncollectible accounts receivable were written off against the allowance for doubtful accounts when all efforts to collect them have been exhausted. Recoveries were recognized when they were received.
Accounts Receivable Accounts ReceivableTrade credit terms are generally offered without collateral and may include an insignificant discount for prompt payment for specific customers. To manage our credit exposure, we perform ongoing evaluations of our customers' financial conditions. In addition, accounts receivable include amounts owed to us under our collaborative research and development agreements and we recognize accounts receivables at invoiced amounts.
Unbilled Receivable Unbilled ReceivableThe timing of revenue recognition may differ from the timing of invoicing to our customers. When we satisfy (or partially satisfy) a performance obligation, prior to being able to invoice the customer, we recognize an unbilled receivable when the right to consideration is unconditional.
Inventories
Inventories
Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined using a weighted-average approach, assuming full absorption of direct and indirect manufacturing costs, or based on cost of purchasing from our vendors. If inventory costs exceed expected net realizable value due to obsolescence or lack of demand, valuation adjustments are recorded for the difference between the cost and the expected net realizable value.
Concentrations of Supply Risk
Concentrations of Supply Risk
We rely on a limited number of suppliers for our products. We believe that other vendors would be able to provide similar products; however, the qualification of such vendors may require substantial start-up time. In order to mitigate any adverse impacts from a disruption of supply, we attempt to maintain an adequate supply of critical single-sourced materials. For certain materials, our vendors maintain a supply for us. We outsource the large scale manufacturing of our products to contract manufacturers with facilities in Austria and Italy.
Property and Equipment Property and EquipmentProperty and equipment classified as construction in process includes equipment that has been received but not yet placed in service. Normal repairs and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred.
Impairment of Long-Lived Assets Impairment of Long-Lived AssetsWe have not identified property and equipment by segment since these assets are shared or commingled. We evaluate the carrying values of long-lived assets, which include property and equipment and right-of-use assets, whenever events, changes in business circumstances or our planned use of long-lived assets indicate that their carrying amounts may not be fully recoverable or that their useful lives are no longer appropriate. If these facts and circumstances exist, we assess for recovery by comparing the carrying values of long-lived assets with their future net undiscounted cash flows. If the comparison indicates that impairment exists, long-lived assets are written down to their respective fair values based on discounted cash flows. Significant management judgment is required in the forecast of future operating results that are used in the preparation of unexpected undiscounted cash flows.
Investment in Non-Marketable Securities
Investment in Non-Marketable Securities
Investment in Non-Marketable Equity Securities
Our non-marketable equity securities are accounted for under the measurement alternative. Under the measurement alternative, the carrying value of our non-marketable equity investments is adjusted to fair value for observable transactions for identical or similar investments of the same issuer or impairment. Adjustments are determined primarily based on a market approach as of the transaction date and are recorded as a component of other income (expense), net. We measure investments in non-marketable equity securities without a readily determinable fair value using a measurement alternative that measures these securities at the cost method minus impairment, if any, plus or minus changes resulting from observable price changes on a non-recurring basis. Gains and losses on these securities are recognized in other income and expenses.
Investment in Non-Marketable Debt Securities
We measure available-for-sale investments in non-marketable debt at fair value. Unrealized gains and losses on these securities are recognized in other comprehensive income until realized. Non-marketable debt securities are classified as available-for-sale securities.
We classify non-marketable debt securities as Level 3 in the fair value hierarchy because we estimate the fair value based on a qualitative analysis using the most recent observable transaction price and other significant unobservable inputs including volatility, rights, and obligations of the securities we hold. Significant changes to the unobservable inputs may result in a significantly higher or lower fair value estimate. We may value these securities based on significant recent arms-length transactions with sophisticated non-strategic unrelated new investors, providing the terms of these transactions are substantially similar to the terms between the company and us. The impact of the difference in transaction terms on the market value of the investment may be difficult or impossible to quantify. See Note 7, “Fair Value Measurements” for additional details.
We evaluate both equity and debt securities for impairment when circumstances indicate that we may not be able to recover the carrying value. We may impair these securities and establish an allowance for a credit loss when we determine that there has been an “other-than-temporary” decline in estimated fair value of the debt or equity security compared to its carrying value. We calculate the estimated fair value of these securities using information from the investee, which may include:
Audited and unaudited financial statements;
Projected technological developments of the company;
Projected ability of the company to service its debt obligations;
If a deemed liquidation event were to occur;
Current fundraising transactions;
Current ability of the company to raise additional financing if needed;
Changes in the economic environment which may have a material impact on the operating results of the company;
Contractual rights, obligations or restrictions associated with the investment; and
Other factors deemed relevant by our management to assess valuation.
•The valuation may be reduced if the company's potential has deteriorated significantly. If the factors that led to a reduction in valuation are overcome, the valuation may be readjusted.
Goodwill
Goodwill
Goodwill represents the excess of the consideration transferred over the fair value of net assets of businesses acquired and is assigned to reporting units. We test goodwill for impairment considering amongst other things, whether there have been sustained declines in our share price. If we conclude it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, a quantitative fair value test is performed. We manage our business as two reporting units and we test goodwill for impairment at the reporting unit level. We allocated goodwill to the two reporting units using a relative fair value allocation methodology that primarily relied on our estimates of revenue and future earnings for each reporting unit. Using the relative fair value allocation methodology, we have determined that approximately $2.4 million, or 76%, of the goodwill allocated to the Performance Enzymes segment and $0.8 million, or 24%, is assigned to the Novel Biotherapeutics segment. We test goodwill for impairment for each reporting unit on an annual basis on the last day of the fourth fiscal quarter and, when
specific circumstances dictate, between annual tests by first assessing qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. During 2020, 2019 and 2018, we did not record impairment charges related to goodwill. We test for goodwill impairment as follows:
Goodwill impairment testing from January 1, 2020
We test for impairment annually on a reporting unit basis, on the last day of the fourth fiscal quarter, and between annual tests if events and circumstances indicate it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. The annual impairment test is completed using either: a qualitative “Step 0” assessment based on reviewing relevant events and circumstances; or a quantitative “Step 1” assessment, which determines the fair value of the reporting unit. To the extent the carrying amount of a reporting unit is less than its estimated fair value, an impairment charge is recorded. Using the relative fair value allocation methodology for assets and liabilities used in both of our reporting units, we compare the allocated carrying amount of each reporting unit’s net assets and the assigned goodwill to its fair value. If the fair value of the reporting unit exceeds its carrying amount, goodwill of the reporting unit is considered not impaired. Any excess of the reporting unit’s carrying amount of goodwill over its fair value is recognized as an impairment.
Since late 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic has spread worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a decline in global and domestic macroeconomic conditions, the general deterioration of the U.S. economy and other economies worldwide, all of which may negatively impact our overall financial performance, driving a reduction in our cash flows. We believe that the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic was a triggering event that gave rise to a qualitative goodwill impairment test in the second quarter ended June 30, 2020. We also conducted a qualitative impairment assessment as of December 31, 2020, which included an evaluation of our cash flow projections to reflect the current economic environment, including the uncertainty surrounding the nature, timing, and extent of the impact of the pandemic in operating our business. We determined that it was more likely than not that the fair value of each of the reporting units exceeded its respective carrying amount as of December 31, 2020. Therefore, a quantitative impairment test of our goodwill at the reporting unit level was not required to be performed.
Goodwill impairment testing before January 1, 2020
Prior to January 1, 2020, the goodwill impairment test consisted of a two-step process. The first step of the goodwill impairment test, used to identify potential impairment, compared the fair value of each reporting unit to its carrying value. Using the relative fair value allocation methodology for assets and liabilities used in both of our reporting units, we compared the allocated carrying amount of each reporting unit’s net assets and the assigned goodwill to its fair value. If the fair value of the reporting unit exceeded its carrying amount, goodwill of the reporting unit was considered not impaired, and the second step of the impairment test was not required. The second step, if required, compared the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. Implied fair value was the excess of the fair value of the reporting unit over the fair value of all identified or allocated assets and liabilities. Any excess of the reporting unit’s carrying amount goodwill over the respective implied fair value was recognized as an impairment.
Leases
Lease Accounting
We determine if an arrangement is a lease at inception. Where an arrangement is a lease we determine if it is an operating lease or a finance lease. At lease commencement, we record a lease liability and ROU asset. Lease liabilities represent the present value of our future lease payments over the expected lease term which includes options to extend or terminate the lease when it is reasonably certain those options will be exercised. The present value of our lease liability is determined using our incremental collateralized borrowing rate at lease inception. ROU assets represent our right to control the use of the leased asset during the lease and are recognized in an amount equal to the lease liability for leases with an initial term greater than 12 months. Over the lease term, we use the effective interest rate method to account for the lease liability as lease payments are made and the ROU asset is amortized to the consolidated statement of operations in a manner that results in straight-line expense recognition. We do not apply lease recognition requirements for short-term leases. Instead, we recognize payments related to these arrangements in the consolidated statement of operations as lease costs on a straight-line basis over the lease term.
Income Taxes
Income Taxes
We use the liability method of accounting for income taxes, whereby deferred tax asset or liability account balances are calculated at the balance sheet date using current tax laws and rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. Valuation allowances are provided when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that will more likely than not be realized.
We make certain estimates and judgments in determining income tax expense for financial statement purposes. These estimates and judgments occur in the calculation of tax credits, benefits and deductions and in the calculation of certain tax assets and liabilities, which arise from differences in the timing of recognition of revenues and expenses for tax and financial statement
purposes. Significant changes to these estimates may result in an increase or decrease to our tax provision in a subsequent period.
In assessing the realizability of deferred tax assets, we consider whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will be realized on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction basis. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of taxable income in the future. We have recorded a valuation allowance against these deferred tax assets in jurisdictions where ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is more likely than not to occur. As of December 31, 2020, we maintain a full valuation allowance in all jurisdictions against the net deferred tax assets as we believe that it is more likely than not that the majority of deferred tax assets will not be realized.
We make estimates and judgments about our future taxable income that are based on assumptions that are consistent with our plans and estimates. Should the actual amounts differ from our estimates, the amount of our valuation allowance may be materially impacted. Any adjustment to the deferred tax asset valuation allowance would be recorded in the statements of operations for the periods in which the adjustment is determined to be required.
We account for uncertainty in income taxes as required by the provisions of ASU 2009-06, Income Taxes (Topic 740) Implementation Guidance on Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes and Disclosure Amendments for Nonpublic Entities, which clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements. The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained on audit, including resolution of related appeals or litigation processes, if any. The second step is to estimate and measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement. It is inherently difficult and subjective to estimate such amounts, as this requires us to determine the probability of various possible outcomes. We consider many factors when evaluating and estimating our tax positions and tax benefits, which may require periodic adjustments and may not accurately anticipate actual outcomes.
The Tax Reform Act of 1986 and similar state provisions limit the use of net operating loss (“NOL”) carryforwards in certain situations where equity transactions result in a change of ownership as defined by Internal Revenue Code Section 382. In the event we should experience such a change of ownership, utilization of our federal and state NOL carryforwards could be limited.
Changes to Tax Law
On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”), P.L. 116-136, was passed into law, amending portions of certain relevant US tax laws. The CARES Act included a number of federal income tax law changes, including, but not limited to: (i) permitting net operating loss carrybacks to offset 100% of taxable income for taxable years beginning before 2021, (ii) accelerating alternative minimum tax credit refunds, (iii) temporarily increasing the allowable business interest deduction from 30% to 50% of adjusted taxable income, and (iv) providing a technical correction for depreciation related to qualified improvement property. The CARES Act had no impact on our consolidated financial statements.
Beginning in 2018, the global intangible low-taxed income (“GILTI”) provisions in the Tax Act required us to include, in our U.S. income tax return, foreign subsidiary earnings in excess of an allowable return on the foreign subsidiary’s tangible assets. Per guidance issued by the FASB, companies can either account for deferred taxes related to GILTI or treat tax arising from GILTI as a period cost. Both are acceptable methods subject to an accounting policy election. At December 31, 2018, we finalized our policy and elected to use the period cost method for GILTI. In 2020, we did not incur any GILTI inclusion as our foreign subsidiaries generated losses. Due to losses incurred in the U.S. we will not be eligible for an Internal Revenue Code Section 250 deduction for foreign derived intangible income.
The BEAT provisions in the Tax Act eliminated the deduction of certain base-erosion payments made to related foreign corporations and imposed a minimum base erosion anti-abuse tax if greater than regular tax. In 2020, our company was not subject to BEAT as it did not meet the requirements to be subject to BEAT.
Accounting Pronouncements
Accounting Pronouncements
Recently adopted accounting pronouncements
In June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which amends the FASB's guidance on the impairment of financial instruments. The standard adds a new impairment model, known as CECL, which replaces the probable loss model. The CECL impairment model is based on estimates and forecasts of future conditions which requires recognition of a lifetime of expected credit losses at inception on financial assets measured at amortized costs. Our financial assets consist of non-marketable debt and equity securities and financing receivable assets measured at amortized cost, comprised of accounts receivable, contract assets, and unbilled receivables . We adopted the new standard in the first quarter of 2020 using a modified retrospective approach requiring a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening accumulated deficit as of the date of adoption. The ASU establishes a new valuation account “allowance for credit losses” replacing the “allowance for doubtful accounts” in the consolidated balance sheets, which is used to adjust the amortized cost basis of assets in presentation of the net amount expected to be collected. The adoption required certain additional disclosures but had no other impact on our consolidated financial statements.
In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. The amendment eliminates Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test. The annual, or interim, goodwill impairment test is performed by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit to its carrying amount. An impairment charge should be recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value; however, the loss recognized should not exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. In addition, income tax effects from any tax-deductible goodwill on the carrying amount of the reporting unit should be considered when measuring the goodwill impairment loss, if applicable. The ASU eliminates the requirements for any reporting unit with a zero or negative carrying amount to perform a qualitative assessment, and if it fails that qualitative test, to perform Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test. An entity still has the option to perform the qualitative assessment for a reporting unit to determine if the quantitative impairment test is necessary. We adopted the ASU in the first quarter of 2020 using a prospective approach. The adoption required certain additional disclosures but had no impact on our consolidated financial statements.
In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework—Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. The primary focus of the standard is to improve the effectiveness of the disclosure requirements for fair value measurements. The changes affect all companies that are required to include fair value measurement disclosures. The standard requires the use of the prospective method of transition for disclosures related to changes in unrealized gains and losses, the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop fair value measurements categorized within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy, and narrative description of measurement uncertainty. All other amendments in the standard are required to be adopted retrospectively. We adopted the ASU in the first quarter of 2020 and the adoption had no impact on our consolidated financial statements nor on our related disclosures.
In November 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-18, Collaborative Arrangements (Topic 808): Clarifying the Interaction Between Topic 808 and Topic 606. ASU 2018-18 provides guidance on how to assess whether certain transactions between collaborative arrangement participants should be accounted for within the revenue recognition standard. The standard also provides more comparability in the presentation of revenue for certain transactions between collaborative arrangement participants. The ASU is to be applied retrospectively to the date of the initial application of Topic 606 which also requires recognition of the cumulative effect of applying the amendments as an adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings of the later or the earliest annual period presented and the annual period inclusive of the initial application of Topic 606. We adopted the ASU in the first quarter of 2020 and the adoption had no impact on our consolidated financial statements nor on our related disclosures.
Recently issued accounting pronouncements not yet adopted
From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the FASB or other standards setting bodies that are adopted by us as of the specified effective date. Unless otherwise discussed, we believe that the impact of recently issued standards that are not yet effective will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements upon adoption.
In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes which is intended to simplify various aspects related to accounting for income taxes. The standard is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted. The standard will be adopted upon the effective date for us beginning January 1, 2021 on a retrospective basis. We believe that the adoption of ASU 2019-12 will have minimal impact on our consolidated financial Statements and related disclosures.
In March 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-04, Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848): Facilitation of the Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting. The standard provides optional expedients and exceptions for applying GAAP to contracts, hedging relationships, and other transactions in which the reference LIBOR or another reference rate are expected to be discontinued as a result of the Reference Rate Reform. The standard is effective for all entities. The standard may be adopted as of any date from the beginning of an interim period that includes or is subsequent to March 12, 2020 through December 31, 2022, on a prospective basis. We will evaluate transactions or contract modifications occurring as a result of reference rate reform and determine whether to elect the optional expedients for contract modification; however, we believe that the adoption of ASU 2020-04 will have minimal impact on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.
In August 2020, FASB issued ASU No 2020-06 Debt—Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging— Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40) No. 2020-06 August 2020 Accounting for Convertible Instruments and Contracts in an Entity’s Own Equity, to reduce the complexity and to simplify the accounting for convertible debt instruments and convertible preferred stock, and the derivatives scope exception for contracts in an entity's own equity. In addition, the guidance on calculating diluted earnings per share has been simplified and made more internally consistent. The standard is effective the for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted for fiscal periods beginning after December 15, 2020. The standard will be adopted by us beginning January 1, 2021. Entities are allowed to adopt the standard using a either a modified retrospective method of transition or a fully retrospective method of transition. We are currently evaluating the effects of the standard on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures; however, we believe that the adoption of ASU 2020-06 will have minimal impact on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.
In October 2020, the FASB issued ASU No. 2020-10, Codification Improvements. ASU 2020-10 provides amendments to a wide variety of topics in the FASB’s Accounting Standards Codification, which applies to all reporting entities within the scope of the affected accounting guidance. The standard is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2020 with early adoption permitted. The standard will be adopted upon the effective date for us beginning January 1, 2021 on a retrospective basis. We are currently evaluating the effects of the standard on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures, however we believe that the adoption of ASU 2020-10 will have no impact the our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.